Video Project

The event we covered for the video project was the fall 2014 Destresser at the University of Wyoming Union. The event is a celebration of the last day of classes and a time to destress before finals. There was cotton candy, stuffed animals, a mechanical bull and other events.

I enjoyed the interviews very much. Setting up the camera and talking with people was fun. I also enjoyed the editing process. Putting together the video was a relaxing experience, having it come together was very rewarding.

I did not enjoy the amount of space video takes up on my hard drive or how long it takes to upload a video to Youtube. I shot the video in 1080p and while it is only 2:30 long it is 2 gigabytes, the unedited data was more than 10 gigs, I may not shoot in 1080p again if it is for a class assignment. Uploading the 2 gig video to Youtube took over an hour which was frustrating as it tied-up my computer.

I was surprised by how little time capturing video and editing video takes. Nothing about my equipment surprised me because I practiced with it before I went out to shoot.

What I found difficult about this assignment was the choosing b-roll footage and the final quote to wrap up the video. Choosing b-roll was difficult because each shot had its own merits but getting it to match the tone of the story was harder than I thought it would be. Picking the final quote was difficult because when interviewing I may not have asked a question that resulted in an answer that summed up the video.

I would like to add video to my repertoire as a photographer. Weddings, athletes and businesses could all use quality videography for promotions or just to capture memories. I would also like to produce videos for my own website.

Live Tweeting

This assignment is to tweet a live event. We need to post at least 10 times about the event and to get an A we needed a photo. The event I chose to cover was the University of Wyoming Mens Basketball game Sunday, December 7 in the Arena Auditorium against the Regis Rangers.

I enjoyed sitting back at the game and spending more time just watching instead of shooting like I normally do. I also enjoyed determining what was tweet-worthy and what wasn’t.

I did not like still having to try to take pictures and write down interesting things that happened. I tried to do do exactly 10 tweets so I felt I was too selective in my tweeting.

I learned that keeping up with stats can be difficult, while the scoreboard has the main stats like points fouls etc., getting seasonal stats, shooting percentages and the like requires a computer, which I could not use sitting on the floor. I also learned that figuring out hashtags ahead of time makes tweeting much easier.

I was surprised by a few things while working on this assignment. The first thing was that the tweets were easy enough to write quickly that I never missed much of the game. Another thing I didn’t expect was how difficult it would be to get a good qoute from fans, they did not say anything really interesting.

I wish I had got the quotes before the game to make the writing a little faster. I also wish I had tweeted more than 10 times. More tweets would have been more informative if people were following me.

I hope to use social media to expose people to my work, get customers for my photography business and network with people in my field to stay current with trends in the photography industry both locally and globally.

Blog Post 8: Soundslides

The purpose of this project is to collect interviews, ambient noise and photos and combine them into a cohesive audio/video slideshow with the program Soundslides.

For this project my partner Miranda Anderson and I made a slideshow about the University of Wyoming Spirit Squad. Miranda collected audio from the head coach of the spirit squad Matthew Ortega and two cheerleaders. I collected ambient noise from the University of Wyoming football game against Utah State and photographed multiple practices and games.

Everything went very smoothly for the entirety of working on the assignment. Miranda has experience working with audio and I am a photographer so picking who would do what was a no-brainer. We decided the University of Wyoming Spirit Squad would be interesting visually and with audio so that was what we went with.

Using Soundslides was a very enjoyable experience. There aren’t too many options to choose from and the interface is user friendly. There were two issues I found with Soundslides. The first issue was the inability to add text boxes over the images. The program allows for captions and titles but if you need to add a slightly longer bit of text there is no way to. The second issue was the lack of spellcheck which is a luxury I appreciate in any program that I use. Other than those two issues Soundslides is a dream to use.

I never encountered any real problems while working on this project. The most difficult thing I encountered was narrowing the selection of photos down to about 7 seconds per photo. An unexpected issue was that the cheerleaders would look into the camera when I would try to take pictures. Both issues were fairly minor and barely impacted the production of the slideshow.

I enjoyed this project and would not change a thing about what was asked of me or what I was able to do.

Edited Audio

Here is the edited audio from my interview with University of Wyoming Senior middle defender Alison Clarke before her final home game as a Cowgirl. She talks about her college career and transferring from one Division 1 program to another.

Alison Clarke kicks a ball during her final home game as a Cowgirl during the University of Wyoming's 4-1 win over the Colorado State University Lady Rams, Oct. 31.

Alison Clarke kicks a ball during her final home game as a Cowgirl during the University of Wyoming’s 4-1 win over Colorado State University, Oct. 31.

Editing the audio from my interview with Alison Clarke was enjoyable. There were no major hiccups while working on the track that I encountered.

I used GarageBand to edit the audio because I have a MacBook Pro. After watching a brief tutorial on how to use GarageBand I was quickly able to start editing the interview. The program was generally intuitive and easy to correct mistakes on.

I enjoyed listening to the final result after working for a while to decide which clips I was going to choose. It was rewarding listening to my final product after hours of work because it sounded like I had planned for it to.

I did not like trying to find the export function in garage band. It took me a while and I felt it was not in an intuitive spot. This was only a minor inconvenience as once I figured it out I did not have trouble fining it again

When editing I was surprised how much audio of Alison I had managed to collect. The interview was on the short side but when I cut myself out I still had nearly 4 minutes of her responses. I was glad that was the case because some shuffling and banging could be heard in some of the clips and I did not have to use them.

I wish that I had not got some of the random noises in my recording. While I was not forced to use any tracks with those problems, I feel I could have recorded the interview again and avoided having my hand forced picking certain clips.

Raw Audio

For our Raw Audio File assignment I interviewed Alison Clarke, a University of Wyoming soccer player, about her experiences as a college athlete.

Interviewing Alison was very easy. She had plenty to say when I asked questions and spoke very clearly. When I was being interviewed I felt nervous about the introduction and felt like I took an eternity to say my name wand what I was talking about. Once the interview turned more conversational I became more comfortable, other than when I began to cough, which was embarrassing.

Both interviewing and being interviewed were good experiences. The only thing I did not like about the interviews was putting time constraints on them. Having to watch the clock made it difficult to decide when to start wrapping up the interview. When I was interviewing Alison, I noticed there was just more than one minute before we reached the deadline so I asked if she had anything else she would like to say. She said no and the interview just passed the four minute thirty seconds mark. I found that situation stressful. Had I been more confident I would have asked a question and got an answer within the allotted time.

For when I was being interviewed I wish I had a taken a drink of water before being asked the questions. Having a dry throat, while not awful, made the interview more stressful than it had to be.

When I was interviewing I wish I had asked one more question to get a bit more audio for the next assignment and not been so close to the minimum allowed time.

Overall I feel both interviewing and being interviewed went well. I am confident that in the future I can successfully interview a person and get good quality audio and good answers from my interviewee.

Photojournalism

Receive

Sophomore Kayla Slofkiss (#5) receives a serve during the Cowgirls' 3-1 win over San Diego State, Oct. 2 at the UNIWYO Sports Complex in Laramie, Wyo.

Sophomore Kayla Slofkiss (#5) receives a serve during the Cowgirls’ 3-1 win over San Diego State, Oct. 2 at the UNIWYO Sports Complex in Laramie, Wyo.


Having a pass to all home sporting events for the University of Wyoming all one has to do is regularly check the game calender and have time to photograph the game.
Volleyball games are always tame compared to sports like basketball or football. The arena never got loud. The energy in the building would pick up when the games got tight but the crowd was generally reserved.
Volleyball is always fun to shoot. You need to move around get shots from above the net, below the net and from in front and behind. Changing it up lets you keep focused on getting different, interesting pictures.
This shot was easy to get. I just had to pick a spot I knew I could see the girls receiving serves and take the picture.
I felt very relaxed shooting the game.
For sports I always shoot with my aperture wide open so the creative device is focus. This is to stop action and minimize distracting backgrounds.

Psych Out

Fans in the student section attempt to psych out opposing players while sophomore Kayla Slofkiss (#5) serves. The Cowgirls won 3-1 over San Diego State, Oct. 2 at the UNIWYO Sports Complex in Laramie, Wyo.

Fans in the student section attempt to psych out opposing players while sophomore Kayla Slofkiss (#5) serves. The Cowgirls won 3-1 over San Diego State, Oct. 2 at the UNIWYO Sports Complex in Laramie, Wyo.

This shot I went onto a balcony to shoot over the net and get the fans with their funny costumes and gestures. When I saw them from ground level I knew I wanted a higher vantage point. It was easy to get.
The creative device for this shot is perspective. By getting onto the balcony and shooting down I could avoid the net and opposing players from messing up the shot and I could crop out the fans behind the first row to limit distractions. The distance also helped keep the player and fans in focus, even though I was shooting at f/2.8.

Good Game

Sophomore Nicole Walker (#9) leads the rest of the Cowgirls in the post game handshake after their 3-1 win over San Diego State, Oct. 2 at the UNIWYO Sports Complex in Laramie, Wyo.

Sophomore Nicole Walker (#9) leads the rest of the Cowgirls in the post game handshake after their 3-1 win over San Diego State, Oct. 2 at the UNIWYO Sports Complex in Laramie, Wyo.

This was another easy shot to get. Having shot volleyball a few times before I knew they would line up at the end of the game so I lined myself up where I thought the perspective would be the most interesting.
The creative devices of this shot are focus, pattern and leading lines. I focused on the lead player because she was closest and there was nobody ahead of her to block the person she is high-fiving. Pattern is the repetition of the players in line. Leading lines is the top and bottom of the net which bring the viewers eye through the image.

Community Service

Volunteer Haley Larkin Mops the floor of the Laramie Plains Civic Center During the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" in Laramie on Saturday, Oct. 11.

Volunteer Haley Larkin Mops the floor of the Laramie Plains Civic Center During the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” in Laramie on Saturday, Oct. 11.

I spoke with SLCE at the beginning of the year and planned to shoot this because I like to brush up on my event photography. I was walking through the hallway when I saw this girl mopping the floor. When I saw the mop to the left I thought I could use it as a balancing element.
This event was easy to shoot. There were lots of people doing interesting things so I had plenty of choices.
I felt the awful pain in my knee when shooting this event. I was running up and down stairs and crawling around on the floor. I should have taken it easier. I also felt glad that I could shoot an event that was so valuable to the community.

Depth and balancing elements are the creative devices in this photo. There is depth because of the mop to the left. I wanted to show how much further she had to go.The mop is also a balancing element. The girl is to the right and the mop is to the left, minimizing dead space in the image.

TD Leap

Junior Running Back Shaun Wick dives past Grizzly defenders for a touchdown during the Cowboys' season opener against Montana State on Saturday, Aug. 30. The Cowboys won 17-12 at War Memorial Stadium in their first game under Head Coach Craig Bohl.

Junior Running Back Shaun Wick dives past Grizzly defenders for a touchdown during the Cowboys’ season opener against Montana State on Saturday, Aug. 30. The Cowboys won 17-12 at War Memorial Stadium in their first game under Head Coach Craig Bohl.

Being the first football game of the year the atmosphere was at a fever pitch.
I shot about 600 pictures during this game. This shot was easy to get because he ran right at me. I didn’t have to do anything but focus on him. This wasn’t the best composed or cleanest photo I took that day but I think this moment trumped the rest.
The only creative device is focus.
I was excited for this game. With a new coach and QB I really wanted to see what kind of first impression they would make on me.
I needed a wide aperture because it was overcast and that blurs the distracting elements in the rest of the photo.

Nothing surprised me about this assignment.
I really wish I had more time to shoot more events.

Photography: Creative Devices

A volunteer sweeps the floor at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.  The currently unoccupied top floor will be reopened and used as office space.

A volunteer sweeps the floor at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18. The currently unoccupied top floor will be reopened and used as office space.

This photo uses viewpoint as its primary creative device. The low angle draws the viewers attention because it minimized the gap between the head of the broom and the person pushing it, allowing for better composition with less dead-space.

A secondary creative device is leading lines. The broom handle leads the viewers eyes from the girl, the main subject, to the broom, explaining what it is she is doing in the photo.

A volunteer cleans seats in the Griffin Theater at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.

A volunteer cleans seats in the Griffin Theater at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The primary creative device in this photo is Leading lines. The rows of chairs converge on the volunteer, bringing the viewer’s attention to him.

A secondary creative device is rule of thirds. I put the subject on the left vertical line of my camera’s rule of thirds overlay to keep him from crowding the edge of the photo, thus making him less awkward in the frame.
Another secondary creative device is pattern. The chairs repeat their shapes in the photo and add order to the image.

A volunteer paints a bathroom stall at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.

A volunteer paints a bathroom stall at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The primary creative device of this shot is framing. I always shoot with the intention of cropping a photo later. This photo is meant to be cropped from right above the paintbrush and around the stall framing the volunteer’s face. The paintbrush and the stall “crop” her face showing only one eye and part of her face. This is to draw attention to her intent stare and minimize distracting elements in the picture.

The secondary creative device is focus. Her eye is where I focused to make her stare where the viewer would focus. The paintbrush is slightly out of focus because the main subject is the girl, not the fact she is painting.

A volunteer cleans in the Griffin Theater at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.

A volunteer cleans in the Griffin Theater at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The primary creative device in this photo is depth. I wanted to show that multiple people were working and the scale of their project. By focusing on the person in the foreground but leaving the people behind her visible the viewer can see that they wee working on a big job.

The secondary creative device is focus. The girl in the foreground is the main subject so I made sure the aperture was wide enough to blur the other workers while allowing the viewer to make out what they were doing.

A volunteer cleans a window in the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.

A volunteer cleans a window in the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The primary creative device of this shot is contrast. I silhouetted her in the window but wanted to keep some light on her face to allow the viewer to see a bit of personality. The shot shows what the girl is doing with minimal distractions from her clothing or other elements.

The secondary creative device is viewpoint. I shot low to put her against the sky instead of the trees. The sky is a clean background and leaves her outline sharp.

Nothing in this assignment was surprising. I have shot enough where I usually do not get surprised by situations.
I would not do anything differently.