Photography: Creative Devices

A volunteer sweeps the floor at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.  The currently unoccupied top floor will be reopened and used as office space.

A volunteer sweeps the floor at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18. The currently unoccupied top floor will be reopened and used as office space.

This photo uses viewpoint as its primary creative device. The low angle draws the viewers attention because it minimized the gap between the head of the broom and the person pushing it, allowing for better composition with less dead-space.

A secondary creative device is leading lines. The broom handle leads the viewers eyes from the girl, the main subject, to the broom, explaining what it is she is doing in the photo.

A volunteer cleans seats in the Griffin Theater at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.

A volunteer cleans seats in the Griffin Theater at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The primary creative device in this photo is Leading lines. The rows of chairs converge on the volunteer, bringing the viewer’s attention to him.

A secondary creative device is rule of thirds. I put the subject on the left vertical line of my camera’s rule of thirds overlay to keep him from crowding the edge of the photo, thus making him less awkward in the frame.
Another secondary creative device is pattern. The chairs repeat their shapes in the photo and add order to the image.

A volunteer paints a bathroom stall at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.

A volunteer paints a bathroom stall at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The primary creative device of this shot is framing. I always shoot with the intention of cropping a photo later. This photo is meant to be cropped from right above the paintbrush and around the stall framing the volunteer’s face. The paintbrush and the stall “crop” her face showing only one eye and part of her face. This is to draw attention to her intent stare and minimize distracting elements in the picture.

The secondary creative device is focus. Her eye is where I focused to make her stare where the viewer would focus. The paintbrush is slightly out of focus because the main subject is the girl, not the fact she is painting.

A volunteer cleans in the Griffin Theater at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.

A volunteer cleans in the Griffin Theater at the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The primary creative device in this photo is depth. I wanted to show that multiple people were working and the scale of their project. By focusing on the person in the foreground but leaving the people behind her visible the viewer can see that they wee working on a big job.

The secondary creative device is focus. The girl in the foreground is the main subject so I made sure the aperture was wide enough to blur the other workers while allowing the viewer to make out what they were doing.

A volunteer cleans a window in the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming's "The Big Event" Saturday Oct. 18.

A volunteer cleans a window in the Laramie Plains Civic Center during the University of Wyoming’s “The Big Event” on Saturday, Oct. 18.

The primary creative device of this shot is contrast. I silhouetted her in the window but wanted to keep some light on her face to allow the viewer to see a bit of personality. The shot shows what the girl is doing with minimal distractions from her clothing or other elements.

The secondary creative device is viewpoint. I shot low to put her against the sky instead of the trees. The sky is a clean background and leaves her outline sharp.

Nothing in this assignment was surprising. I have shot enough where I usually do not get surprised by situations.
I would not do anything differently.

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